• Building Focus

    I’ve received a few requests for this post, so here it is: my approach to focus. It is not an end-all be-all solution for everybody, but rather a look at the key underlying ways you can keep yourself moving towards a task. The tricks here should work well for anybody, but some may need to […]

    Read more »
  • The Case for Chinese: the Legos of Languages

    I enjoy explaining to others just what it is that makes me enjoy learning and speaking Mandarin Chinese so much, as it is a language which is poorly understood. Shrouded in mystery in the west, we’re likely to see it employed as a “mystical” tattoo instead of as a communicative tool.   ¬†Love learning languages? […]

    Read more »
  • Research: Can We Learn Digitially?

    Nobody wants digital learning techniques (software, games etc.) to succeed more than me. I was formally trained in computer science and video game design, and readers of the blog know that neuroscience, human learning and foreign languages are all amongst my primary interests. I’ve even created a few iPhone apps aimed at helping students of […]

    Read more »
  • Activation Energy: The Science of Getting Started

    How many times have you put off starting something? How many times did that same task end up being relatively easy, once you finally got started? In chemistry, activation energy is the “minimum energy required to start a chemical reaction.” What is fascinating about the concept is that this initial energy typically far exceeds the […]

    Read more »
  • Experiment: Switching Languages

    After I learned Mandarin Chinese, Spanish and a little Arabic I did not think that switching between foreign languages was very hard. The three (plus English) were all from distinctly different language families, which made the task relatively painless. Not only did they sound different but the very grammar and roots of each of the […]

    Read more »
  • How to Become Ambidextrous

    It always seemed cool to me to be ambidextrous. People who can do things with both hands are more versatile; if you’ve ever broken your dominant hand, you know how useful this skill can be.¬† As I began to do research for this experiment, though, I discovered a number of other reasons to become ambidextrous […]

    Read more »
  • Experiment: Study Drugs (Results, Part One)

    Sometimes experiments do not work out quite the way we expect.  The study drugs experiment is one of those cases.  It was fraught with problems, from shipping errors to technical problems to all-out hardware failures.   I do not consider the experiment to be a failure by any means.  I did manage to collect at […]

    Read more »
  • Study Hack: 5 Things Teachers wish Students Knew

    I dislike school.  This may be surprising given that, despite culminating my upper-education with a Bachelor’s degree a year ago, I have not been outside the classroom for more than a summer at any point in my life.   Schools, especially those in the formal educational system, are extraordinarily imperfect tools at best.  The vast […]

    Read more »

Back to Top